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20121027
20121104
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KPIX (CBS) 11
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
>>> good morning to our viewers in the west. it's wednesday, october 31st, 2012. welcome to "cbs this morning." the damage from sandy is staggering. more than 50 dead and nearly 7 million people without power. >> the storm has crippled travel along the east coast. we are inside an airline command center to see the struggle to get back to normal. >> and a massive construction crane continues to dangle over midtown manhattan. john miller takes us inside what went wrong. >> but we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener. your world in 90 seconds. >>> it's the worst thing that happened in this city, certainly, since 9/11. >> millions in the northeast struggle in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> the death toll continues to rise as a result of the storm. >> more than 6.5 million people are still without electricity. >> very difficult day. >> new jersey certainly hit the hardest. >> itis sight of devastation that makes it look as if there had been a bombing there. >> rescue teams trying to go house to house helping those who could not leave on their own. >> trapped in their
already packing trains and buses to get into the city. we have live team coverage. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec on the left with beefed up patrols for the rowdy fans but first we kick it off with cate caugiran along the parade route with people already staking out seats for the parade. isn't that right? i can see them behind you. >> reporter: you think we wake up early? true giants fans wake up earlier than us. people are already lining up on market street where the parade route will begin so they have been here and ready for it and so has the city. the city has been setting up. you can take a look they have been working nonstop to set up the big stage for our world series champs at the civic center plaza. giants president larry baer, bruce bochy, pablo sandoval will be given speeches. bay area transit groups have been hard at work with all hands on deck. they have been advising fans along with giants pride to be patient today. >> we have all hands on deck. we're not holding anything back. we're going to have every, single train that's available starting at 4 a.m. until the end of servi
police say more than a million people turned out for the parade. cbs 5 reporter mike sugerman was in the middle of all that excitement. >> reporter: it was really exciting and, you know, we did this two years ago. we did it again. it's getting old hat? i don't think anybody thought so today. they came from far and wide and came early. >> we have been here since 11 p.m. we parked and we're just here walking around. >> reporter: they were far from alone. san francisco's homeless population skyrocketed overnight. they just wanted to see the champs. what's it like the second time? >> even better, man. i mean, to be able to take this home to the fans again, obviously, we did it in a little different fashion but, you know, we're here once again and it's fun to share with them. >> we're here to thank them. they are part of this club. we believe that. and they helped us do this. they filled the house every night. we want to thank them. >> reporter: it's estimated one million people would show and it looks like they did. >> i found this broom on the side of the road about two months
a replica of a historic ship made for a movie. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran joins us now with a dramatic rescue operation as that ship went down. >> reporter: the boulder police departmenty was built in 1960 as a replica of the original 1787 vessel. the bounty was built and now it's a complete loss. one by one the coast guard plucked crew from the ocean. the bowny sank when her engine and pumps failed. it was built in 1960 as a replica of the original 1787 vessel. >> it's a sad thing with a ship like that. a sad thing. >> all that work and all the history of that boat just gone, just like that. >> reporter: the bounty's captain is still missing. this were 16 crew on board, 14 were rescued. one person died. this morning, here are pictures out of new jersey that show that extreme damage. this storm is being blamed for flooding, toppled trees on cars, downed power lines and thousands of evacuees forced to seek higher ground. atlantic city became an extension of the atlantic ocean. seaweed and ocean debris swirled in the knee deep water covering downtown streets. take a look at this. this is
and businesses still without power, down from 8.5 million at the worst. the total cost could hit $50 billion. cbs reporter ines ferre is in new york where the city is beginning to bustle again. >> reporter: new yorkers are trying to regain a sense of normalcy. they are trying to restore power and mass transit. >>> reporter: the storm moved away from the shore but the devastation left behind is obvious. homes devastated or destroyed, boats tossed ashore. >> very difficult day. >> reporter: the national guard spent the day rescuing stranded residents in moonachie and little ferry, new jersey. tidal surge up the hackensack river pushed five feet of water into the two towns in just 45 minutes. >> within a matter of minutes where the basements are completely flooded. we're just waiting for this rescue. >> reporter: president obama will tour the devastation in new jersey today. >> the most important message i have for them is that america is with you. >> reporter: it could take days or weeks to restore power to the 8 million people who lost electricity. >> how are you going to stop water? >> reporter:
. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran joins us with the dramatic rescue operation as that ship went down in the storm. cate. >> reporter: we will talk about that but right now i want to let you know that hundreds of people are being evacuated in the northern new jersey town this a levee broke flooding the area. as you were mentioning off north carolina, this was a dramatic rescue of the hms bounty. one by one coast guard plucked crew from the ocean. the bowny sank when her engine and pumps failed. it was built in 1960 as a replica of the original 1787 vessel. it was used in a number of big budget films. >> it's a sad thing with a ship like that. a sad thing. >> all that work and all the history of that boat just gone, just like that. >> reporter: the bounty's captain is still missing. this were 16 crew on board, 14 were rescued. one person died. this morning, here are pictures out of new jersey that show that extreme damage. this storm is being blamed for flooding, toppled trees on cars, downed power lines and thousands of evacuees forced to seek higher ground. atlantic city became an ex
a bus burning a few nights ago. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec with how social media led them to another vandalism suspectly. suspect and police hope to catch two more. >> reporter: you know with the invention of the cell phone everything is an amateur videographer these days and now police are hoping that the product of that the cell phone video people take will turn the masses into amateur detectives. check out this cell phone video police just released showing an event that happened early monday morning around 12:30 a.m. after the giants won the world series on sunday night. it's in slow motion. you can see guys throwing something burning into the muni bus. windshield is already smashed. this again was taken at 12:30 on monday morning at market and third streets. police say they have already arrested this guy after this picture was taken by the "san francisco chronicle" then widely circulated on social media sites. >> you make the front page of the paper, your goose is cooked. >> reporter: here is that suspect mugshot 22-year-old gregory tyler graniss of san francisco now facing felon
in line. cbs reporter randall pinkston joins us from the jersey shore with problems people are facing. >> reporter: good morning. the number of utility workers from around the country getting their power back online, mass transit coming back online, but there's so many problems, there's so many people who have lost homes, the temperatures are dropping, they don't have electricity, they don't have heat so small wonder that tempers are fraying. >>> reporter: you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is still left to be done. the nights are especially hard for people without electricity. >> we've been cold some nights. >> dark and cold. >> reporter: con ed says it will have power back on tomorrow for hundreds
's arms. also, in new york, a man was arrested for pulling a gun when he tried to cut into a gas line. cbs reporter randall pinkston joins us from the jersey shore with the problems people there are facing. >> reporter: that gun pulling stunt puts you on edge em if you are in a gas line like many of us are. you know, every day the public officials hold news conferences to talk about what's being accomplished. a lot is being accomplished. for example, we have utility workers from around the country helping to restore power. but when you have people who have no heat, no power, people standing in gas lines, it's understandable that tempers are fraying. >>> reporter: you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is sti
. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec is in san francisco with the bus fire caught on tape. anne. >>> reporter: it is amazing how the cell phone has changed things. it's turned everybody into an amateur vig videographer. it already helped them catch one alleged vandal and now police are hoping cell phone video will help them catch two arsonist. this cell phone videoed is in slow motion so you can see th faces. police released this yesterday. you can see a couple of guys throwing something burning into the muni bus. windshield is already smashed. police took some still pictures from this video of two suspects they are hoping to catch. this was taken sunday after the giants celebration when things got out of hand on market and third. police have already arrested this guy after this picture was taken by the "san francisco chronicle" published there, then widely circulated on social media sites. >> he makes the front page of the paper, you're pretty much your goose is cooked. >> reporter: now, here is that suspect's mugshot. 22-year-old gregory tyler graniss of san francisco. he is facing felony c
to cancel the plans. however many have decided to stay and volunteer. >>> we're proud to announce that cbs corporation, our parent company has contributed $1 million to the american red cross. it was also match contributions made by any employees by making an additional contribution. >>> counting down to election day. attitudes toward the death penalty are changing here in calf. a new pole -- in california. a new poll finds that half of california voters prefer to replace the death penalty from life in prison without patrol. that's a shift when many said that life in prison would cost too much. grace lee weighs in. >> this has been surprising for two reasons. number one for six decades calf fornians have supported the death penalty. also at this point in the election cycle most people typically vote no. but what we're seeing here is an increase of yes votes and that's why this has been so surprising. >>> the people in the bay area who count ballots tell us that they have noticed something a little different this election. absentee ballots are not coming in as fast as they did in 2008 and t
, made cbs colleague, jason jackson. the story of this book were exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on the phone as i did all the mothers who go for the book who lost their sons and i said carol, i would like to type you about richard. >> are you selling t-shirts quite >> no, ma'am, i'm from the naval academy and i have an important project like to talk to you about. i don't want to cut to the naval academy. she was actually torn at the time. she was suffering about her son said she had reached out to buy the academy family and we can do better. i said ma'am, we're writing about to honor richard. our classmate. over a hundred books to make him 30 make third roommate to would like to hear your voice. do it for richard, do for those who served. a few weeks ago, after we sold out our first printing at the naval institute press, i
with a wide lead there, 51-43%, but a dead heat in florida, according to a cbs news, "the new york times" quinnipiac poll. and in ohio, mitt romney trails the president by about five points. >> how is all of this playing in the battleground this morning. headline in the miami herald, groups brace for show down. some worried about possible recounts, sending lawyers to their states. >> some other papers, denver post said obama ryan visits last in fight for colorado. strategists say the struggle isn't for undecided, it is to make sure registered voters actually get out and get to the polls. >> and the wisconsin sentinel says obama, romney make change, key issues on the stump. and new jobs report to consider. chuck todd, nbc's political director and chief white house correspondent, has more on all of this. chuck, good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. you may want to talk about other states, but i think it is coming down to one. polls close in ohio in about 105 hours. between now and 7:30 p.m. eastern time tuesday night when the polls close in ohio, an hour may not go by without one
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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